Blog Archives

Water

 

As I walk around each day I feel a sense of hopelessness. It’s that same pinch of hopelessness in my heart from my parents’ divorce over a decade ago and I wonder if true love can last. It’s the deep and steadfast hopelessness that arises each time I remember that my brother is living on the streets and getting high on drugs every day.

I go to class and put on a close to perfect face, but inside I am just waiting for the phone call to hear that my brother has overdosed, and this time it’s fatal.  If that day were to ever come, I would bake chocolate chip cookies for him one last time and put them right by his grave, along with a stack of baseball cards.

I try to talk to people about my feelings, but people just say, “I am sorry,” and they think it will get better.

Well I am tired of that answer! I am tired of feeling stuck and I am just waiting for this big piece of my life to fade away.  If you have family or friends dealing with addiction to drugs or alcohol, I know you can relate.

So, I am here to encourage you…right?

I don’t have perfect little things to say and I don’t have the answers – if I did, I would take my own advice.  But, what I do know is that you should find just one person you can talk to, such as an aunt, grandma, teacher, tutor, someone at Youth Outreach, or a friend.  Even press into faith if you believe.  I would encourage you find someone who will just listen and be there.  And not say, “I’m sorry.” In my eyes, to say “I am sorry,” is for little things, like, “I’m sorry you missed class today because the teacher did something wild!”  If you can’t find someone, then write. Write a page to whoever in your life is abusing drugs or alcohol. Then write clearly what you would say to them.  I know this might sound silly, but trust me – it helps.  After you write this letter, read it out loud and know that it is okay to cry! Next, take a thick black pen and draw over the things that really upset you. After, tear it up, go workout, and just allow yourself to feel what you feel.

Another helpful coping method is to find something that you love to do: cook, journal, maybe clean, or play music. What I have found important is to keep yourself busy in a healthy way.  One of the things that I like to do is write poetry.  Poems can take on many forms, so there are no rules and there is no pressure.  It’s very therapeutic.  Here is piece I wrote that reflects on hopelessness in a hopeful way.

 

Water

It has its perks and it rocks my boat.  I swallow my words to not say a thing to anyone about anything, so I will stay on the path of rowing

I sit on a boat and I look at how calm the water is on top.  Do I dare look below to see all the hurt that I have seen

Would I be able to look back up

Why is it so hard for me to keep my mouth to myself

I start to think about things that I could do to maybe have control for once

I glance at the idea of what I could breathe in and then I remember all the people around me that are at the bottom of the ocean because of taking that first dirty creation

They have no way of swimming up because every time they try and take a breath it’s filled with more dirty water and they can’t float up

The question becomes how could I save the people in my life that are treating their bodies as a miserable disguise

I wonder if these addictions will fly away

A family is by a simple definition to be healthy and to love

Is the definition for people that are surrounded in dirty water to just breathe in

I can’t imagine becoming one of them

I see how their life will never go back to being who they once were

If that was the case, it would be broken hearts and deep desires to let anything in

Do I have hope

I want to believe that I do

Now what

I can jump in with a lifejacket

I can swim with goggles and make eye contact with them

I can keep breathing underwater and wave them to come up

Then, when I have no more air I can come back up

My lifejacket is God

and the people around me

They are holding me so tight that nothing is stopping me

I know that God will never leave me so my security is solid

But how do I keep my own dignity from hurting the people that are a part of me

and

right

down

under me

Life is a journey and no one can say life is easy

It they do, they are either blind or life is blinding them

So, I say to you dear people that are living a life full of life

Don’t think that you can’t make a change, a difference, or have a new way at looking at life

Trust that you have the boat with lifejackets and that you can steer in the direction you choose

You will always have the people that are breathing in dirty water

a part of you

But you and whoever is not a part of the dirty water will be in your boat

So, look up and see the leaves changing

Have hope that you are hope

Know that you are

not alone

Hooked on Heroin

Smack, horse, dope, skunk, H. You can smoke it, snort it, or even inject it. It’s one of the most addictive drugs out there, and in recent years, the number of people ages 12-17 in America who have started using it has increased by 300%.

Heroin is produced from morphine, a naturally occurring substance that comes from the seedpod of poppy plants. It can look like a white powder, a darker brown powder, or a tar-like substance. Approximately 1/4 people who try it end of becoming addicted and physically dependent on it.

Some of the short-term effects are:

  • euphoria
  • warm flushing of the skin
  • dry mouth
  • heavy extremities
  • alternately wakeful then drowsy state
  • mental functioning becomes clouded due to the depression of the central nervous system
  • slurred speech
  • slow movement
  • constricted pupils
  • droopy eyelids
  • impaired night vision
  • vomiting
  • constipation

Some of the long-term effects are:

  • collapsed veins
  • infection of the heart lining and valves
  • liver disease
  • pulmonary complications
  • pneumonia
  • suppresses breathing
  • clogging blood vessels that lead to lungs, liver, kidneys, and brain
  • infection or death of cells in vital organs

Basically, heroin destroys your body. 

People become addicted to heroin so easily because it moves to the brain so quickly. Users become tolerant of it, so they need to use more and more to reach the same high they want. They can also experience withdrawals within just a few hours after they last time they used. So of course, they use multiple times a day so they don’t have to deal with those withdrawals. Heroin withdrawals include: drug craving, restlessness, muscle/bone pain, insomnia, diarrhea, vomiting, and cold flashes.

Sounds like a pretty miserable way to live, right?

Heroin addiction is treatable, but some people become so addicted that recovery can take several years, even decades.

So really, is it worth it? I think the answer to that is obvious. Heroin ruins people’s bodies and their lives… don’t even go there.

A Deadly Addiction

If thought about, it is agreeable that we, as human beings, make connections with a variety of people and objects. Some people we have not met, yet we have made a connection with them solely on the basis of seeing them on TV or hearing them on the radio. Any one person’s death is a tragedy to another, especially if they are a family member, but even if they are a celebrity. The cause of death can be vast, but one thing is clear: death steals.

Recently it was reported that Amy Winehouse, a famous singer and songwriter, died early this week. The autopsy was inconclusive as to the direct cause of death, but Winehouse openly admitted in interviews that she battled drug use. Whether or not Ms. Winehouse died from drugs is not the issue-although quite controversial, it is the importance of  knowing and understanding the effects of drug addiction that we look at Winehouse’s life choices.

There are various thoughts about drug addiction in general and the majority of views point to it being a negative thing. Drug addiction or even alcoholism tears family apart, destroys trust and health, and leaves people desolate. According to treatment-centers.net people who become dependent on substances can be held by its grasp either mentally or physically, both showing outward signs. A lot of people believe that drug addiction and alcohol dependence is easily fixable, especially if you have lots of money, by going to treatment centers and making the decision to change. However, it is more complex than that because it is a disease that is dealt with by taking a step-by-step process each and every minute of every day.

Those who even have the strongest will power or a lot of money may not be able to overcome their addictions easily. If you have a friend who is dependent on drugs or alcohol, let them know that they are not alone in dealing with it. There are people who understand and can truly help them before it is too late. Don’t let addiction, to anything, take away their life from you and the ones who love them. Talk to them today about getting help.